Our mission is to preserve and protect the health and wellbeing of family carers of qualifying Buckinghamshire-based dementia patients at home, by funding respite through the provision of dementia-trained carers from organisations, under the umbrella of Care Quality Commission.

A wealth of information exists about dementia on specialised websites, with extensive details for those not familiar with it and those wanting to acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge. Some of the great organisations we referenced include:

Dementia UK  |  Alzheimer's Society  Alzheimer's Research UK

Our website is primarily for carers of patients already diagnosed with dementia and the following information summarises current thinking, as well as providing dementia statistics for Buckinghamshire.

In 2022, dementia was the leading cause of death in England and Wales, with 66,000 deaths, accounting for 11.4% of the total*

There are currently 944,000 people with dementia in the UK - more than ever before - and this number is projected to increase significantly. In Buckinghamshire alone,  9437 people are currently living with dementia.

45% of dementia patients are fully dependent on a family carer or a friend and receive no NHS or Council support and 52% of the UK public know someone who has dementia.

To find out more about the UK dementia statistics, visit https://dementiastatistics.org/about-dementia/maps/

Whilst many people can live their entire lives without developing dementia, it is not unknown for the disease to be diagnosed in sufferers who are still in their 40s or 50s. Although dementia is more common in those over 70, it does not occur exclusively in older people.

Most of us, with our busy lives, occasionally forget where we’ve left the car keys or forget the name of a colleague. These are merely signs of ageing and do not mean that we have dementia. Although dementia symptoms vary widely, it is normally a combination of forgetfulness, repetition in speech and inability to complete multi-step tasks that points towards the disease and should trigger a move to seek a medical diagnosis.

Dementia covers a wide range of specific medical conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease. In Alzheimer’s, abnormal brain changes lead to a decline in thinking skills and cognitive abilities and, when severe, it can impair daily life and independent function. Dementia can also sadly affect behaviour, feelings and relationships.

*Office of National Statistics

Types of Dementia

There are various different types of dementia, each with its own causes. Click the drop down to see more details about some of the main ones.

The Stages of Dementia

Although dementia experts are moving away from classifying the progress through dementia as early, middle and later, these classifications do offer an indication of what stage the dementia has reached.

The Treatment and Local Facts

There are currently 944,000 people with dementia in the UK - more than ever before - and this number is projected to increase significantly. In Buckinghamshire alone,  9437 people are currently living with dementia.

45% of dementia patients are fully dependent on a family carer or a friend and receive no NHS or Council support and 52% of the UK public know someone who has dementia.

To find out more about the UK dementia statistics, visit https://dementiastatistics.org/about-dementia/maps/

The treatments currently available in the UK for Alzheimer’s disease may slow, but do not stop the progression of the disease and may help manage the symptoms for a time. It’s important for the sufferer, the carer and dementia experts to discuss treatment options available.